Tragidion coquus – Second Time!

Tragidion coquus female photographed at Hughes Mountain Natural Area, Sep. 28, 2019.
f/18, 1/30 sec., ISO-400, 234 mm focal length equivalent

For the second year in a row, a special beetle that has been described by our own Ted MacRae as “one of the rarest and most beautiful species of longhorned beetle to occur in Missouri” was found during the joint field trip of the WGNSS Entomology and Nature Photography groups at Hughes Mountain Natural Area. Tragidion coquus, purported to be spider wasp mimics, mine in dead oak branches and can be found in flight between June and November.  I wasn’t happy with my photos of last year’s specimen (also a female), so I was thrilled to be able to take the time and set her on some foliage with fall colors. It was an almost disaster as she was able to take flight before we were finished. But, having the quick reflexes of a Marvel superhero, I was able to catch her out of the air with a quick grab with just a slight kink in her antennae in consequence.

Tragidion coquus female photographed at Hughes Mountain Natural Area, Sep. 28, 2019. f/14, 1/60 sec., ISO-400, 234 mm focal length equivalent

 

Return to Vilander Bluff

Autumn View of Vilander Bluff
f/11, ISO-160, 32 mm focal length, three exposure blend of 1/60, 1/15, 1/4 sec.

I had a great time introducing some photographer friends of mine to one of my favorite places in the state, Vilander Bluff. With the largest bluffs on the Meramec River, to get the type of view seen here requires a little bit of effort. Dave and I put in some work in finding this new-to-me perspective that was well worth the bit of effort and risk. Next time we’ll need to bring climbing ropes…

Blazing Maple
f/5.6, 1/6 sec., ISO-1250, 45 mm focal length

Wallen Creek Shut-ins

Wallen Creek Shut-ins. Getting it all in.
f/14, 1/2 sec., ISO-200, 29 mm focal length.

Many thanks to Casey Galvin tracking this one down and to the property owners allowing us access.

Wallen Creek Shut-ins.
f 5.6, 1/10 sec., ISO-100, (0 mm focal length.
Wallen Creek Shut-ins.
f/11, 1/2 sec., ISO-125, 90 mm focal length, vertical stitch of three images.
Wallen Creek Shut-ins
f/8, 1/5 sec., ISO-160, 90 mm focal length.
Wallen Creek Shut-ins swirling
f/14, 15 sec., ISO-200, 19 mm focal length.

Missouri Orchids – Spiranthes lacera (slender ladies tresses)

Spiranthes lacera, St. Francois Co, MO. f/16, 1/50 sec., ISO-640, 234 mm focal length equivalent

I only managed to photograph one of the Spiranthes this year. I had opportunities for others, but I just couldn’t get to the right place at the right time. Good news is that it shouldn’t be too difficult to add them next year.

Spiranthes lacera, St. Francois Co, MO. f/16, 1/60 sec., ISO-640, 234 mm focal length equivalent

A bit closer really shows off the delicate details in flower and twisting stem.

Spiranthes lacera with passenger, St. Francois Co, MO. f/16, 1/50 sec., ISO-640, 234 mm focal length equivalent

Dashing Blue Dashers

Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) – f/8, 1/160 sec., ISO-200, 520 mm focal length equivalent
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) – f/8, 1/200 sec., ISO-160, 520 mm focal length equivalent
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) – f/8, 1/160 sec., ISO-200, 520 mm focal length equivalent
Blue Dasher (Pachydiplax longipennis) – f/11, 1/160 sec., ISO-320, 520 mm focal length equivalent

WGNSS Nature Photo Group Travels to Snake Road

Timber Rattlesnake feeling safe. f/7.1, 1/60 sec., ISO-640, 205 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth letting its freak flag fly. f/5, 1/160 sec., ISO-640, 322 mm focal length equivalent.
Missing Muppet? f/5. 1/125 sec., ISO-1600, 342 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth found at Larue Road. f/5, 1/125 sec., ISO-1600, 342 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth closeup. f/7.1, 1/100 sec., ISO-1600, 520 mm focal length equivalent.
Green Treefrog. f/5.6, 1/200 sec., ISO-640, 520 mm focal length equivalent.
Larue “Snake” Road, Autumn 2019. f/5, 1/100 sec., ISO-1250, 213 mm focal length equivalent.