Birds of Quivira – Some Assorted Shorebirds

Upland Sandpiper
Upland Sandpiper

Tonight I am sharing a few miscellaneous shorebirds.  First up to bat is a shorebird that isn’t much of a shorebird at all – the Upland Sandpiper.  So named due to its preference for higher and drier habitat, the Upland Sandpiper can be found in fields and meadows.  Look for it on a typically elevated perch and find it by its haunting song.

Red-necked Phalarope
Red-necked Phalarope

With a ratio of what must have been close to 1000:1, the Wilson’s Phalarope greatly outnumbers any other Phalarope.  However, Steve and I were still able to find and ID a couple of Red-necked Phalarope in winter plumage, as pictured above.

 

Black-necked Stilt
Black-necked Stilt

A true wetland favorite, the Black-necked Stilt is as pleasing to watch for its behavior as it is a piece of natural art.

Willet
Willet

As stout and cute as a Bulldog puppy, Willets are always a site for sore eyes.

Willet
Willet

On our last evening and during our very few hours of decent, golden hour light Steve and watched a number of Willets and Avocets feeding in the shallows near the road.

-OZB

 

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Upland Sandpiper

Every since I heard of the weird sandpiper that decided to live in the plains, away from considerable amounts of water, I dreamed of seeing and photographing them.  Our trip this summer to Dunn Ranch Prairie provided for that, adding a new bird to both Steve’s and my life lists.

IMG_8651 “Upland Sandpiper, Dunn Ranch Prairie, 2013”

IMG_8737“Upland Sandpiper in Flight, Dunn Ranch Prairie, 2013”