Whooping Cranes visit Missouri and Illinois

Whooping Cranes
Camera settings: f/6.3, 1/3200 sec., ISO-320, 700 mm focal length.

I have traveled to Kaskaskia Island, IL at least 7 times in the past four years in hopes of being fortunate to find these beautiful birds in close distance to a road. Most visits result in being able to find them, but most often they are a football field or more away. Back in early January 2020, Sarah and I finally won the lottery.

Whooping Crane
Camera settings: f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO-250, 700 mm focal length.

We found these birds quite close to the road and actively foraging in the permanent drainage canals of this river valley farming area.

Catching crayfish.
Camera settings: f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO-250, 700 mm focal length.

Whooping Cranes are still endangered; however, thanks to the USFWS/USGS captive breeding and reintroduction program, this species has come back from the brink of extinction. In 1941 the species was down to only 21 individuals due to rampant conversion of natural habitat to farmland, coastal development, and unregulated hunting. The captive breeding program was initiated in 1967 and today there are now more than 800 birds in the wild.

Catching frogs in January Camera settings: f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO-320, 700 mm focal length.

Captive breeding and reintroduction has now been transferred from the federal institutions to a good number of other organizations who will continue towards the goal of making the Whooping Crane self-sufficient again. This efforts is not completely without problems as there have been and continue to be problems associated with getting the reintroduced birds to migrate, interact and successfully nest.

Whooping Crane
Camera Settings: f/6.3, 1/2000 sec., ISO-250, 420 mm focal length equivalent.

A case in point may be the recent history of these birds in the state of Missouri (only the 8th record in MO since 1953). The first reports of a four-bird cohort observed in Columbia MO was in May, 2016. These were the same birds observed over-wintering in Kaskaskia Island, IL. These four birds were from a release who then strayed from their population that was following the traditional Wisconsin to Florida migration route. Since then at least two of the original four birds have died. Hopefully these two (I have been told, but have not yet been able to confirm that this is a sexual pair) will get back on track one day and do their part in propagating the species.

Whooping Crane Camera Settings: f/8, 1/2000 sec., ISO-125, 700 mm focal length.

Thanks for visiting.

-OZB

WGNSS Nature Photo Group Travels to Snake Road

Timber Rattlesnake feeling safe. f/7.1, 1/60 sec., ISO-640, 205 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth letting its freak flag fly. f/5, 1/160 sec., ISO-640, 322 mm focal length equivalent.
Missing Muppet? f/5. 1/125 sec., ISO-1600, 342 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth found at Larue Road. f/5, 1/125 sec., ISO-1600, 342 mm focal length equivalent.
Cottonmouth closeup. f/7.1, 1/100 sec., ISO-1600, 520 mm focal length equivalent.
Green Treefrog. f/5.6, 1/200 sec., ISO-640, 520 mm focal length equivalent.
Larue “Snake” Road, Autumn 2019. f/5, 1/100 sec., ISO-1250, 213 mm focal length equivalent.

White-tailed Deer

Something is in the air

Until this autumn, I never considered targeting our abundant white-tailed deer as a photo subject. When my friend, Miguel, brought up the idea along with a place with a lot of potential, I asked him to lead the way. We set up in a copse of trees located near the center of a scrub field in an area that does not allow hunting and Miguel’s predictions of worry-free males still on the hunt came to fruition.

Buck and Foxtail

Although I cam ill-prepared, leaving my tripod and any other means of support at home, the light was just sweet enough to allow for proper hand-holding the big 500mm. Once I took off the unnecessary teleconverter, it worked even better.

Spike

We counted at least two larger bucks that patrolled the area, but found this young spike buck as well. He was not quite as confident as the other two.

Doe

Females walked the area as well, but were more skittish. The bucks were more curious when they first heard the sounds of our shutters slapping and picked up our sent in the light morning breeze. The does, however, tended to trot away at first sign that something different lurked in our copse.

White-tailed Deer

This spot turned out to be quite nice. With the rising sun to our backs, the trees at the far edge of the field provides for a nice backdrop for that warm light to hit against. These guys have probably, or will soon be dropping these nice racks. With any luck we can try more of this next year.

Thanks for paying a visit!

-OZB

 

Bird #275

Eastern Screech Owl - Strigidae - Megascops asio, Grafton IL
Eastern Screech Owl – Strigidae – Megascops asio – Grafton IL

The 275th bird species I have photographed in Missouri and contiguous states turned out to be a special one.  This Eastern Screech Owl is definitely the current most famous bird in the bi-state area.  Many thanks to Miguel Acosta for the information.  A long time coming.

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Eastern Screech Owl – Strigidae – Megascops asio – Grafton IL

-OZB

Prothonotary Warbler

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

Way back in April Steve and I visited Larue Road, AKA “Snake Road”, to visit the swamps of western Shawnee National Forest.  We came up mostly short on snakes and found way to many naked apes on this particular Saturday, but we were pretty certain to find a good feathered reptile show, and we were not disappointed.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

The Prothonotary Warbler is a staple of southern swamps and this area sure has its share.  We were pleasantly surprised to find a number of these birds foraging along the road, without a care about what we were up to.  This allowed for some very nice looks and photographic opportunities.

Prothonotary Warbler
The Original Entomologist

The image above shows how these guys (and most warblers) go about making a living.  They know better than any entomologist that the best opportunities for finding caterpillars and spiders is to look under leaves and inside the folds and crevices of new leaves and flowers.

Prothonotary Warbler
Prothonotary Warbler

We didn’t find a nest cavity of one of these monks during this visit, but they were undoubtedly tending nests and potentially caring for eggs.  If only this area were not a three hour drive!

Cute Coots
Cute Coots

Lastly, at one end of the road we were greeted by a gang of Coots feasting on Coon’s Tail.

Thanks for the visit.

OZB
email: handsomeozarkbillyboy@gmail.com